Why Stoptrack?

Standard security provided with vehicles is now often quickly and easily bypassed by new devices that use technology to steal vehicles. These devices are widely available to thieves, requiring no checks when purchasing them and there is no legislation to prevent sale or ownership. Many of these devices serve no purpose other than to defeat a vehicle’s integrated security protocols and steal the vehicle.

Worryingly, vehicle thefts recently shot up by 56% within a 12-month period with no signs of declining.

During this period a vehicle was stolen almost every 6 minutes in England and Wales, amounting to an annual total of 89,000 recorded incidents.

StopTrack has been developed to offer protection against all known vehicle theft methods deployed by the modern-day thief. These include:

Image
Cloned keys

A cloned key is an unauthorised duplicate key. It can be achieved very quickly and involves taking the original key and copying the data onto a new transponder, so that it’s an identical match to the original. The vehicle can’t tell and so both keys are allowed to start the engine.

Image
Radio/relay attack

This type of theft is probably one of the simplest out there. Using a capture device on a keyless entry vehicle, the key fob's signal can be picked up by a thief and transmitted/relayed to another device placed within close proximity to the vehicle (up to 100 metres away). Once the signal is received it is copied rather than decrypted and can be used to not only open the vehicle, but also to start the vehicle in many cases.

Image
Electronic compromise

This attack is carried out through the vehicles On Board Diagnostic port or Canbus wiring system. Thieves can connect to a vehicle usually via the On Board Diagnostic port, but also on occasion through wiring located elsewhere on a vehicle. They then access the vehicle’s ECU (brain) and using pre-configured devices can programme new keys or bypass the vehicle's security protocols in order to allow it to start. This type of bypass can take as little as 7 seconds on many high-end and luxury vehicles and is favoured by organised criminals.